Squiz Today / 22 June 2023

Squiz Today – Thursday, 22 June

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Squiz Today Podcast

We’ve got you good. 

Today’s listen time: 7.30 minutes

SYD
7 / 17
MEL
6 / 14
BNE
8 / 22
ADL
9 / 13
PER
7 / 17
HBA
3 / 11
DRW
20 / 31
CBR
0 / 12

Squiz Sayings

“It’s not about discrimination. You have to fit into the building.”

Said Brooklyn apartment building co-owner Motti Lerer who supports the meat/fish ban that new renters must sign up to if they’re to move in. The one-bedders available are going at $6,600 and $8,450/month, so you wouldn’t have the dosh to splash on protein anyway…

Time is running out

THE SQUIZ

The search for the missing Titan submersible has entered its fourth day, and there was a surge of hope yesterday after a sonar-equipped Canadian aircraft twice “detected underwater noises in the search area”. In response, the US Coast Guard said that its remote-operated search vessels were redirected to identify the noises’ source. But time is of the essence with the vessel’s emergency air supply set to run out later today. “I pray for a miracle. At this point, I think that’s what it would take to find these folks alive,” said CBS science reporter David Pogue, who took a trip in the Titan to view the Titanic shipwreck last year.

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE OPERATOR’S SAFETY RECORD?

OceanGate’s CEO Stockton Rush, who is one of the 5 passengers aboard the Titan, is a longtime booster of deep-sea tourism and has been described as one of the “great American dreamers”. And what OceanGate does is pretty unique and inherently dangerous. But reports say that back in 2018, an employee raised concerns about “the potential dangers to passengers of the Titan as the submersible reached extreme depths”. An industry group also penned a letter voicing concerns that the “experimental” approach of the Titan craft risked “negative outcomes (from minor to catastrophic)”. Another thing to consider is it’s possible that the Titan has come to the surface but hasn’t been found. Yesterday, Pogue said that because the passengers are bolted in from the outside, “even if they can see the air through the plexiglass window, they can’t get to it” because they are sealed in. “That, to me, is a horror story,” he said. 

WHAT HAPPENS NOW?

So far, at least 4 aircraft and half a dozen boats are assisting in the search and rescue mission, with more equipment incoming. American and Canadian military planes have been sweeping the ocean in case, as Pogue says, the Titan has already surfaced. And sonar probes have been dropped into the ocean – it’s these that detected the noises that have rescuers hopeful. Also en route to the search site is a French boat carrying an exploration robot, which is remote-controlled via an 8km cord. One of the 5 missing passengers is a French Titanic expert, Paul-Henri Nargeolet – reports say he’s made more than 35 previous trips to the famous wreck. In a 2019 interview, Nargeolet made it clear that he was aware of the risks. “When you’re in very deep water, you’re dead before you realise that something is happening, so it’s just not a problem.”

World News

Squiz the Rest

Biden says the ‘d’ word

And no, it’s not ‘diplomacy’… It took fewer than 24 hours after US Secretary of State Antony Blinken’s relationship-thawing visit to China for things to take an awkward turn after President Joe Biden referred to his Chinese counterpart as a “dictator” yesterday. At a fundraiser in California, Biden said Xi Jinping was left red-faced after a Chinese spy balloon was shot down over the US in February. “That’s a great embarrassment for dictators. When they didn’t know what happened,” he said. China’s foreign ministry responded, with spokesperson Mao Ning saying the remarks were “a blatant political provocation” and “extremely absurd and irresponsible”. The dialogue dust-up comes as a Lowy Institute opinion poll found while 56% of Aussies are glad Oz-China relations are on the mend, 52% believe Beijing poses a military threat to us within the next 2 decades. 

World News

Charges and court for 2 notorious men

Andrew Tate, the misogynistic – and hugely popular – social media influencer, has been charged by Romanian police with human trafficking, rape, and organising a crime group to exploit women. Tate’s brother Tristan and 2 associates were also charged. Police allege that the Tate brothers lured women with promises of loved-up bliss before coercing them into filming stuff we can’t articulate here due to the email police… Tate and Co deny the allegations and say they will “demonstrate their innocence and vindicate their reputations”. 

And while we’re talking legal issues, President Biden’s son Hunter has agreed to plead guilty to 2 misdemeanour charges of failing to pay taxes on time. His attorney believes the plea will resolve any further legal investigations, but Republicans say he deserves more than “a slap on the wrist”.

Want to know more about these blokes? We’ve got a Squiz Shortcut on Andrew Tate and Hunter Biden for this very purpose.

Crime World News

Fresh data on deaths in custody

In a move long called for by advocates, academics, and families of those who have died behind bars, all deaths in custody will now be reported in real-time. More than 540 Indigenous Australians have died in custody since a Royal Commission into the issue was finalised in 1991 – yesterday, Federal Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus said it is a “national shame”. Since then, the Australian Institute of Criminology has reported Indigenous deaths in custody every quarter, but experts say more timely data will prevent, identify, and resolve issues faster. Advocates say it will also help to hold governments accountable. The updated information will track deaths occurring in police/prison custody and in youth detention centres. Apryl Watson – the daughter of Tanya Day, who died in custody in 2017 – said the data won’t do anything alone, but “alongside preventative and accountability measures, I think that could make a difference.” 

Australian News Crime

NSW doesn’t want to talk about it

The second State of Origin ended with a decisive win for the Maroons, who pummelled the NSW side 32-6. Three minutes into the game, star Blues fullback Tom Trbojevic left the field with a pectoral injury, and it was downhill from there. A breakaway sprint from Maroons captain Daly Cherry-Evans at the half-hour mark brought Suncorp Stadium, in Brisbane, to new sonic levels, and at halftime his side was up 10-0. From there, Queensland were ferocious and clinical, handing their coach Billy Slater a comprehensive endorsement and likely ending the Origin career of NSW coach Brad Fittler. The Maroons were the favourites heading into the game after winning the first match 26-18, and last night’s win means their second Origin series in a row. NSW have a chance to save face on 12 July in Sydney.

Sport

Taylor’s coming to town

Swifties, are you ready for it?… Taylor Swift, no introduction needed, has delighted Aussie fans by finally announcing dates to bring her Eras tour to Melbourne and Sydney over 2 weekends in February next year. The tour has become a bit of a cultural phenomenon, with cities across the US outdoing each other to welcome the singer. Glendale in Arizona temporarily changed its name to Swift City, and Houston, Texas, renamed its NRG Stadium to NRG Stadium (Taylor’s Version). Tampa, Florida, didn’t want to be outdone, making Swift honourary mayor for the day. As for what Melbourne and Sydney could do, we’re thinking Swift projected on the Opera House sails? Premier of Victoria? Or why not go to the top: Taylor for PM?

Australian News Entertainment

Apropos of nothing

Tess and Andrew Herbert from Eugowra in NSW’s Central West have been named the 2023 Farmers of the Year. The cattle, sheep, and crop farmers were rewarded for their innovative approach, which has helped them through droughts and floods.

Qantas has dropped from 5th to 17th place in the latest Skytrax World Airline Awards – its lowest-ever ranking thanks to ongoing service issues. Singapore Airlines overtook Qatar Airways to claim the top spot for the first time since 2018. 

And the 2023 World’s 50 Best Restaurants List is out, with Central in Peru’s capital Lima taking the top spot as the first establishment outside Europe or the US to come in first. Aussie food writers and restauranteurs were cranky that no local eateries made the cut this year. More great food for us, we say…

Quirky News

Squiz the Day

7.45pm (AEST) – Women’s State of Origin Game 2 – Townsville

9.00pm (AEST) – Women’s Ashes – One-Off Test – Australia v England – Nottingham

ABS Data Release – Characteristics of Australian Business, 2021-22 financial year; Film, Television and Digital Games, Australia 2021-22 financial year

Winter Solstice – the shortest day of the year

The premiere of new Wes Anderson flick Asteroid City and season 2 of SATC sequel And Just Like That… on Foxtel/Binge

Birthdays for Meryl Streep (1949), Cyndi Lauper (1953), and Dan Brown (1964)

Anniversary of:
• Galileo Galilei being forced to recant his view that the Earth orbits the Sun by the Pope (1633)
• Princess Elizabeth meeting her future husband, Prince Philip of Greece (1939)
• Nazi Germany invading the Soviet Union during WWII (1941)
• the deaths of Judy Garland (1969) and Fred Astaire (1987)
• a 6.2 magnitude earthquake in Afghanistan, killing at least 1,000 people (2022)

Australian News

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