Squiz Today / 24 August 2022

Squiz Today – Wednesday, 24 August

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Squiz Today Podcast

Getting you into your news groove.

Today’s listen time: 9 minutes

SYD
7 / 17
MEL
7 / 14
BNE
8 / 21
ADL
8 / 14
PER
6 / 18
HBA
5 / 14
DRW
20 / 33
CBR
-3 / 13

Squiz Sayings

“I hope that Mr Kyrgios will reflect on the harm he has caused me and my family and offer a prompt resolution to this matter.”

Said Anna Palus, the Polish tennis fan who Aussie player Nick Kyrgios said was disrupting his Wimbledon final and looked like she’d had “about 700 drinks”. Palus is now rallying in a different court

Morrison’s ministries fine, but not ok…

THE SQUIZ
Last week, PM Anthony Albanese wrote to Solicitor-General Stephen Donaghue to ask him one question: “Was Mr [Scott] Morrison validly appointed to administer the Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources on 15 April 2021? Yesterday, Donaghue’s response was made public – yes, our former PM’s appointment to that portfolio was valid, but it “was inconsistent with the conventions and practices that form an essential part of the system of responsible government”.

HANG ON, I THOUGHT THERE WERE MORE PORTFOLIOS THAN THAT…
There were. Between March 2020 and May 2021, Morrison also appointed himself to the Health, Finance, Treasury and Home Affairs portfolios. They aren’t included in the advice because it was the Resources portfolio where Morrison exercised his ministerial powers. But the advice applies to the other appointments as well, Albanese says. And there are 2 other issues to call out. First, the advice has given Governor-General David Hurley a pass on his role in the saga – he “has no discretion to refuse to accept the prime minister’s advice in relation to such an appointment,” Donaghue writes. And the second has to do with Morrison’s cloak-and-dagger approach. Donaghue says that if the public and the parliament are not informed of appointments, it means “the principles of responsible government are fundamentally undermined.”

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?
First cab off the rank is Albanese has asked the PM’s Department to work with the G-G’s office “to adopt a practice of publishing in the Commonwealth Gazette future appointments of ministers to administer departments.” That way, whoever the PM is, any future ministerial moves would be on the public record even if they aren’t announced by the government in a press conference or media release. And there will be an inquiry into what Morrison did. What that looks like will be revealed later, but Albanese says it will be headed by “an eminent person with a legal background to consider all of the implications”. He also said that it “needs to be not a political inquiry”, but says Morrison “undermined our parliamentary democracy, and he does need to be held accountable for it.” Morrison responded late yesterday – he says he will participate in “any genuine process to learn the lessons from the pandemic”.

AusPol

Squiz the Rest

Ukraine marks a grim milestone

Ukraine marks 31 years of independence from the Soviet Union today – and it’s 6 months since Russia launched its invasion on 24 February. The embattled country has been preparing for ramped-up attacks by Russia ahead of the double anniversary, with officials in Kyiv and other cities banning public Independence Day celebrations. Those fears have been backed up by warnings from US officials of Moscow’s plans to strike key infrastructure in the coming days. And there are concerns that the killing of Darya Dugina, the daughter of an ultra-nationalist Russian ideologue, will lead to revenge attacks. The Kremlin has blamed Ukraine for her death, but Kyiv says the claims are “propaganda”. And amongst all the doom and gloom, the Ukrainian Premier League restarted yesterday, sans spectators. Shakhtar Donetsk captain Taras Stepanenko says the season will show the world Ukraine’s “will to win”.

World News

Trump sues over Mar-a-Lago raid

Lawyers for former US President Donald Trump have filed a lawsuit against the federal government over the FBI’s search of his Mar-a-Lago home earlier this month. The Justice Department says it seized 11 sets of classified files from the Florida estate in its investigation into Trump’s removal of the documents from the White House when he left office in January 2021. They added to the more than 150 sensitive documents retrieved from Mar-a-Lago in January. Trump denies any wrongdoing and says the raids were politically motivated to prevent him from running for the top job in 2024. His legal action is to stop the FBI from reading the seized documents until an independent lawyer can be appointed to read them first. There have also been growing calls for the search warrant to be unsealed – that’s yet to be determined.

World News

Winter ain’t over yet…

Or at least it isn’t for swathes of southern Australians – they’re shivering through yet another cold snap after a run of spring-like days. According to the weather bureau, a wet and windy cold front is currently sweeping through most of southeast Oz including Tassie, Victoria, NSW, the ACT, and parts of South Australia, bringing snow to Tassie and alpine areas in NSW and Victoria. Minimum temperatures in Sydney, Adelaide, Brisbane and Melbourne are all forecast to dip below 10C for most of the week. Notable exceptions are Western Oz and northern Queensland – both enjoying a good week of winter weather – and in the Northern Territory, where fire warnings have been issued. And while spring’s around the corner, don’t unpack the togs just yet… The latest climate outlook forecasts warmer days for parts of northern Oz and Tassie, but there’s a high chance of wet/cool conditions, particularly in the east. Brrr…

Australian News Weather

Whispering Jack laid low

Australia’s good and great have wished iconic Aussie singer John Farnham all the best after learning he was in hospital in Melbourne for surgery to deal with a cancerous growth. Last night, his family confirmed he’d endured an 11.5-hour operation and was in a stable condition. In a pre-op statement, Farnham said that dealing with cancer “is something that so many people face every single day, and countless others have walked this path before me.” And Richard Wilkins, Nine’s entertainment editor/close friend, said that the specialists were confident that they “can get it all and that the operation will be successful”. The 73yo’s health troubles come 2 weeks after the death of his close friend Olivia Newton-John from cancer, and his longtime manager Glenn Wheatley died earlier this year from COVID complications. Farnham would want us to be glass-half-full about it all, so we’ll point to this clip with Norman Gunston (aka Garry McDonald) which gave us the giggles…

Australian News Entertainment

Those wascally wabbits

New research has traced Australia’s rabbit invasion back to a single shipload of the animals in 1859. The European rabbit first arrived on the Aussie mainland with the First Fleet in 1788, and there were many more importations in the following years for food and hunting purposes. But historians have long suspected that the nationwide infestation started at Barwon Park, the estate of English settler Thomas Austin, near Geelong. In 1859, Austin received a shipment of 24 wild rabbits from Baltonsborough in southwest England, and within 3 years, the 2 dozen animals turned into many thousands. And after analysing historical records and genetic material from 187 rabbits caught across Australia, New Zealand, the UK and France between 1865 and 2018, researchers from Cambridge and NSW unis determined that Aussie rabbits were most genetically similar to those from Baltonsborough. Thanks for nothing, Thomas…

Australian News

Apropos of Nothing

Drake is the most Shazamed artist of all time, with more than 350 million Shazams across songs he has either been on or featured. And if we can use ‘Shazam’ a couple more times, Shazam is an app that identifies songs playing near you.

What do Gen Z women/girls want to be when they grow up? More than 50% would quit school or their job to become influencers. Meanwhile, most Gen Xs and older will continue to be sceptical about whether it’s a real job…

Researchers in Japan say some pooches turn on the waterworks when they’re reunited with their people. It appears to be linked to the “bonding hormone” oxytocin, and they say it’s “the first report demonstrating that positive emotion stimulates tear secretion in a non-human animal”. Just don’t go telling your buddy they’re non-humans…

Quirky News

Squiz the Day

12.30pm (AEST) – Comedian/writer/singer/media presenter Em Rusciano addresses the National Press Club – Canberra

6.00pm (AEST) – 2022 AFL Awards – Melbourne

Independence Day in Ukraine, as the country marks 6 months since Russia’s invasion

Company Earnings Results – Domino’s Pizza; Coles Group; Sonic Healthcare; Tabcorp; Seven Group Holdings

ABS Data Release – Domestic Violence: Experiences of Partner Emotional Abuse, August (First Release)

Birthdays for comedian Stephen Fry (1957), director Ava DuVernay (1972), comedian Dave Chappelle (1973), author John Green (1977), and actor Rupert Grint (1988)

Anniversary of:
• the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, burying Pompeii and Herculaneum and killing 15,000 (79)
• the invention of the potato chip by chef George Crum in New York, according to popular legend (1853)
• Amelia Earhart becoming the first woman to fly nonstop across the US (1932)
• Tim Cook becoming CEO of Apple after the resignation of Steve Jobs due to health reasons (2011)
• the ouster of PM Malcolm Turnbull/Scott Morrison becoming PM (2018)

Squiz the Day

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